SCIENCE TEAM

The Video Encyclopedia of Physics Demonstrations was designed by teachers for teachers with the support of the
National Science Foundation.

Scientific Direction

Jearl Walker, Ph.D

Professor of Physics at Cleveland State University earned his undergraduate and graduate degrees at MIT and the University of Maryland. In 1990, he became the sole author of David Halliday and Robert Resnick’s textbook, Fundamentals of Physics. Now in its 10th edition, the widely used textbook been translated into 16 languages with over 4million copies sold world-wide.

In 1975, Dr. Walker wrote the book, Flying Circus of Physics, which popularized physics by identifying real-world physics phenomena that occur in daily life. He furthered his commitment to explaining physics to non-physicists for the Amateur Scientist section of the magazine, Scientific American, where he contributed over 150 articles on topics ranging from the physics of judo to the physics of béarnaise sauce and lemon meringue pies.

Along with hosting the Emmy award winning PBS television series, Kinetic Karnival, Dr. Walker was also a regular guest on the Canadian radio show, Quirks and Quarks, and the Discovery Channel Canada show, Daily Planet, He also performed a live physics demonstration during an appearance on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson.

Richard Berg, Ph.D

Richard Berg received a bachelor’s degree in music and physics from Manchester College, Indiana, and earned his master and doctorate degrees in physics from Michigan State University.  His research involved development of the MSU sector-focused cyclotron and gamma-ray spectroscopy with the cyclotron proton beam using Ge(Li) detectors that he fabricated.

As an assistant professor of physics at the University of Maryland, his research included design and construction of the external beam transport system for the new cyclotron and development of germanium detectors for use with heavy particles.  From 1972 to 2008, he served as Director of the University of Maryland Physics Lecture-Demonstration Facility, and was Professor of the Practice in Physics from 2001 to 2008. His book, The Physics of Sound, co-authored by David Stork, is now in its 3rd edition with Pearson Prentice-Hall.  In his capacity as Director of the Lecture-Demonstration Facility, he wrote many scholarly articles and developed a physics demonstration library with more than 1500 demonstrations.

Over a period of approximately twenty years, Dr. Berg presented more than 500 demonstration programs to groups ranging from elementary school students to physics professors.

Additional Scientific Assistance

Brett Carroll, Ph.D

Brett Carroll (1959 – 2015) studied physics at Washington State University prior to a lengthy career as a physics demonstration specialist at the University of Washington, and then as a physics and geology lab technologist for Green River College.
A long-time member of PIRA, Brett Carroll was an educator and award-winning inventor. Well known for his involvement in fostering new educators, Dr. Carroll was instrumental in creating an interdisciplinary science class for future teachers.

Arthur Huffman, Ph.D

Arthur Huffman teaches physics and astronomy at UCLA, where he has been in charge of the lecture demonstration facility for decades. His active involvement in school out-reach programs gives him a special understanding of the problems related to bringing physics and astronomy to everyone.

Joe Redish, Ph.D

Edward F. (Joe) Redish is a Professor of Physics at the University of Maryland in College Park. He received his undergraduate degree Magna Cum Laude from Princeton University and a Ph.D. in theoretical nuclear physics from M.I.T. His research in nuclear theory emphasized the theory of reactions and the quantum few-body problem. As a nuclear theorist, he served on the national Nuclear Science Advisory Committee and served as Chair of the Program Committee for the Indiana University Cyclotron.  Since 1985 he has been actively involved in the subject of physics education. His current research effort is devoted entirely to physics education at the college level.

His work in physics education has contributed to the use of computers in physics education, cognitive modeling of student thinking in physics, and the role of student expectations and epistemologies in their learning of physics. Recently, his work has focused on the development of a new introductory physics course for life science students (biology majors and pre-health care professionals).

He has received awards for his work in education from the Washington Academy of Science, the Maryland Association for Higher Education, Dickinson College, Vanderbilt University, and the Robert A. Millikan Medal from the American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT). In 2005, he received the NSF Director’s award as a Distinguished Teaching Scholar. In the summer of 2012, Joe received the medal of the International Commission of Physics Education at the World Physics Conference in Istanbul, and was awarded the AAPT’s Oersted medal at their national meeting in January 2013. In April 2015 he received the American Physical Society’s Excellence in Physics Education Award.

Special Thanks

This series made possible by

Dr. Gerhard Salinger and The National Science Foundation.

Special Appreciation

Mark N. McDermott

The demonstrations for this series provided by

The University of Washington Physics Department.

Additional demonstrations provided by

The University of Maryland, Physics Demonstration Facility.

This material is based upon work supported by The National Science Foundation under Grant
No. MDR-9150092

Scientific Direction

Scientific Direction

Jearl Walker, Ph.D

Professor of Physics at Cleveland State University earned his undergraduate and graduate degrees at MIT and the University of Maryland. In 1990, he became the sole author of David Halliday and Robert Resnick’s textbook, Fundamentals of Physics. Now in its 10th edition, the widely used textbook been translated into 16 languages with over 4million copies sold world-wide.

In 1975, Dr. Walker wrote the book, Flying Circus of Physics, which popularized physics by identifying real-world physics phenomena that occur in daily life. He furthered his commitment to explaining physics to non-physicists for the Amateur Scientist section of the magazine, Scientific American, where he contributed over 150 articles on topics ranging from the physics of judo to the physics of béarnaise sauce and lemon meringue pies.

Along with hosting the Emmy award winning PBS television series, Kinetic Karnival, Dr. Walker was also a regular guest on the Canadian radio show, Quirks and Quarks, and the Discovery Channel Canada show, Daily Planet, He also performed a live physics demonstration during an appearance on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson.

Richard Berg, Ph.D

Richard Berg received a bachelor’s degree in music and physics from Manchester College, Indiana, and earned his master and doctorate degrees in physics from Michigan State University.  His research involved development of the MSU sector-focused cyclotron and gamma-ray spectroscopy with the cyclotron proton beam using Ge(Li) detectors that he fabricated.

As an assistant professor of physics at the University of Maryland, his research included design and construction of the external beam transport system for the new cyclotron and development of germanium detectors for use with heavy particles.  From 1972 to 2008, he served as Director of the University of Maryland Physics Lecture-Demonstration Facility, and was Professor of the Practice in Physics from 2001 to 2008. His book, The Physics of Sound, co-authored by David Stork, is now in its 3rd edition with Pearson Prentice-Hall.  In his capacity as Director of the Lecture-Demonstration Facility, he wrote many scholarly articles and developed a physics demonstration library with more than 1500 demonstrations.

Over a period of approximately twenty years, Dr. Berg presented more than 500 demonstration programs to groups ranging from elementary school students to physics professors.

Additional Scientific Assistance

Additional Scientific Assistance

Brett Carroll, Ph.D

Brett Carroll (1959 – 2015) studied physics at Washington State University prior to a lengthy career as a physics demonstration specialist at the University of Washington, and then as a physics and geology lab technologist for Green River College.
A long-time member of PIRA, Brett Carroll was an educator and award-winning inventor. Well known for his involvement in fostering new educators, Dr. Carroll was instrumental in creating an interdisciplinary science class for future teachers.

Arthur Huffman, Ph.D

Arthur Huffman teaches physics and astronomy at UCLA, where he has been in charge of the lecture demonstration facility for decades. His active involvement in school out-reach programs gives him a special understanding of the problems related to bringing physics and astronomy to everyone.

Joe Redish, Ph.D

Edward F. (Joe) Redish is a Professor of Physics at the University of Maryland in College Park. He received his undergraduate degree Magna Cum Laude from Princeton University and a Ph.D. in theoretical nuclear physics from M.I.T. His research in nuclear theory emphasized the theory of reactions and the quantum few-body problem. As a nuclear theorist, he served on the national Nuclear Science Advisory Committee and served as Chair of the Program Committee for the Indiana University Cyclotron.  Since 1985 he has been actively involved in the subject of physics education. His current research effort is devoted entirely to physics education at the college level.

His work in physics education has contributed to the use of computers in physics education, cognitive modeling of student thinking in physics, and the role of student expectations and epistemologies in their learning of physics. Recently, his work has focused on the development of a new introductory physics course for life science students (biology majors and pre-health care professionals).

He has received awards for his work in education from the Washington Academy of Science, the Maryland Association for Higher Education, Dickinson College, Vanderbilt University, and the Robert A. Millikan Medal from the American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT). In 2005, he received the NSF Director’s award as a Distinguished Teaching Scholar. In the summer of 2012, Joe received the medal of the International Commission of Physics Education at the World Physics Conference in Istanbul, and was awarded the AAPT’s Oersted medal at their national meeting in January 2013. In April 2015 he received the American Physical Society’s Excellence in Physics Education Award.

Special Thanks

Special Thanks

This series made possible by

Dr. Gerhard Salinger and The National Science Foundation.

Special Appreciation

Mark N. McDermott
Jefe Del – Chairman from Department of Physics at University of Washington.

The demonstrations for this series provided by

The University of Washington Physics Department.

Additional demonstrations provided by

The University of Maryland, Physics Demonstration Facility.

This material is based upon work supported by The National Science Foundation under Grant
No. MDR-9150092